Food and Drink

Two ways to make ceviche, the perfect summer seafood dish

As the days get warmer and longer, switching out heavier foods for lighter fare is easy with this make-ahead chilled seafood, two ways. Ceviche, raw fish or seafood that’s “cooked” in citrus juices, is easy to serve up for last-minute entertaining, or pack and take camping or fishing. For the shrimp version, a light steam speeds up the marinating process. I love pairing scallops with hearts of palm, as the vegetable mimics the shape and color of the scallop but adds a surprising textural contrast. Hearts of palm in jars or cans are available in most grocery stores.

Make sure to use the freshest possible seafood. High-quality seafood that’s been frozen and thawed properly works well if you don’t have fresh. Best enjoyed the day of, as the citrus will continue to “cook” the seafood and change the texture. Add in as much heat as you like, but keep in mind that chile peppers can surprise from one to the next. If you’re timid, remove all the seeds and ribs where the burn resides. If the final mix proves a tad too hot, add in some avocado or cucumber. Serve with a chilled rosé or a lightly effervescent Portuguese Vinho Verde.

Shrimp with tomato ceviche

Depending on the size of your shrimp, you might need a bit more citrus juice to cover.

Makes 4 to 6 servings, as an appetizer

1 to 1 1/2 pounds raw wild shrimp

1/2 cup fresh squeezed lime juice

1/2 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice

1/2 cup chopped fresh tomato (or 1/4 cup fresh tomato juice or ketchup)

1/4 cup chopped red or white onion

1 small jalapeño or serrano chile, stems and seeds removed, thinly sliced

Hot sauce, to taste

Salt and freshly-ground black pepper, to taste

Garnishes: Lime wedges and extra-virgin olive oil; fresh cilantro; chopped avocado or cucumber; flake salt

For serving, popcorn or crackers; plantain chips; hot tostones; cabbage or lettuce cups

Peel and de-vein, as needed, fresh raw shrimp. If shrimp are large, cut into pieces. Place into a glass or other non-reactive bowl. Add lime juice and lemon juice. Let marinate in fridge at least 2 hours — shrimp should be pink with a nice sheen — and up to overnight. When ready to serve, stir in tomato (or juice/ketchup), onion, jalapeño, and salt and pepper, to taste. Drizzle with olive oil and serve with lime wedges, and any of the optional serving suggestions.

For a shorter marination time: Prepare a bowl of ice and water. Bring a medium pot of water to a gentle boil. Add shrimp and set timer for two minutes. Drain and add shrimp to ice bath. Let marinate in fridge 30 minutes and up to overnight. When ready to serve, stir in tomato (or juice/ketchup), onion, jalapeño; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Drizzle with olive oil and top with fresh cilantro; serve with lime wedges, flake salt and any of the optional serving suggestions.

Scallop ceviche with hearts of palm, lime and coconut

Note: Depending on the size of your scallops, you might need a bit more citrus juice to cover.

Makes 4 to 6 servings, as an appetizer

1 1/2 pounds raw large diver scallops

1/2 cup fresh-squeezed lime juice

1/2 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice

2-3 Tablespoons coconut cream

1 small Scotch Bonnet, jalapeño or serrano chile, stems and seeds removed, thinly sliced

1 (14-ounce) can hearts of palm, drained

Garnishes: Lime wedges and extra-virgin olive oil; chopped avocado or cucumber; fresh cilantro or chervil; flake salt

For serving: crackers; plantain chips; cabbage or lettuce cups

Slice scallops in half lengthwise or cut into bite-size pieces. Place into a glass or other non-reactive bowl. Add lime juice and lemon juice. Let marinate in fridge 45 minutes to one hour. When ready to serve, stir in coconut cream, jalapeño, and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Slice hearts of palm and divide among 4 to 6 serving bowls. Top with scallop ceviche; drizzle with olive oil and top with fresh cilantro; serve with lime wedges, flake salt, and any of the optional serving suggestions.

Sponsored