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Crime & Courts

Anchorage man convicted for 2nd time on federal child-porn charges gets 10-year sentence

More than a decade after he was sentenced in an Anchorage court on federal child-pornography charges, a man has again been ordered to spend 10 years in prison for similar crimes committed last year.

Andrew Weed, 48, received the sentence Wednesday for possession of child pornography and failure to register as a sex offender, according to a statement from Acting U.S. Attorney Bryan Schroder's office.

Weed was first convicted in 2004 on 18 counts of possessing and distributing child porn, after prosecutors said he had run multiple child-porn sites and uploaded imagery to them.

The newer case stemmed from child porn downloaded at Weed's workplace last year and stored at his home, where investigators found more than 106,000 explicit images on May 31, 2016.

"After briefly talking to law enforcement that day, outside his residence, Weed fled Anchorage and thereafter failed to report to work with his employer, and failed to return to his residence," federal officials wrote.

When Weed left Anchorage, prosecutors said, he didn't notify the state sex offender registry within 24 hours that he'd changed his address, a violation of federal law. He remained at large for two months until he was arrested on Aug. 2 in Valdez by U.S. marshals.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Audrey Renschen, who prosecuted Weed, said his line of work before the 2016 case didn't put him in contact with children — a condition of his release from the 2004 case. His employer provided significant help to investigators before authorities tracked him down.

"He actually left Anchorage and he had spent some time in Wasilla, and then the marshals found him in Valdez," Renschen said.

Renschen said Weed pleaded guilty to the two counts in the 2016 case in exchange for prosecutors dropping an initial charge of distributing child porn.

After Weed leaves prison, he will spend the rest of his life on supervised release.

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