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Letters to the Editor

Letter: Don Young betrays oath of office, should resign

  • Author: Rick Steiner
    | Opinion
  • Updated: December 19, 2019
  • Published December 19, 2019

Ignoring overwhelming, incontrovertible and uncontested evidence, Congressman Don Young’s vote Wednesday against articles of impeachment is a vote for continued foreign interference in U.S. elections, for presidential abuse of office, for ignoring the rule of law and for obstructing the constitutional duty of the U.S. Congress. In short, it is a vote for tyranny and imperialism.

Young’s continual attempt to defend the indefensible is inexcusable. While American democracy was once a shining example of governance around the world, Mr. Young joins other Republicans in making a mockery of this proud legacy.

History reminds us that the line between democracy and fascism is thin. Now, with the enthusiastic help of Mr. Young, and likely soon Sens. Dan Sullivan and Lisa Murkowski, for the first time in our history America has crossed that line. For now, Republicans have made America a fascist nation.

Who would have imagined that Republicans would so clearly subvert our democracy, in perverse allegiance to an avowed enemy (Russia), simply to remain in power? Ronald Reagan, Dwight Eisenhower and Abraham Lincoln must be rolling in their graves.

Despite his claims, Mr. Young was never “Congressman for all Alaska.” He only represents his supporters. But his vote this week betraying our Constitution, democracy and rule of law should be the final act in his long, checkered career. Mr. Young is clearly unable to put nation over party, or democracy over imperialism. Although he swore to “support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic,” Mr. Young has clearly betrayed this oath. With respect, he should resign.

— Rick Steiner

Anchorage

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