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Kenai fire crews aim to protect structures on eastern front

Zaz Hollander,Devin Kelly,Tegan Hanlon
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns near Skilak Lake on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The forest near Upper Killey River, a tributary of the Kenai River, smolders on Monday, May 26, 2014, a day after the Funny River fire burned through the area, jumping the Kenai River.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Ted Wellman, left, and his brother Tom Wellman maneuver TomÕs boat in a shallow part of the Kenai River two miles upstream from their homes in the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling on Monday, May 26, 2014. The Funny River fire crossed the Kenai River and is burning its way towards the Sterling highway.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns south of the Kenai River in Soldotna on Monday, May 26, 2014. The Funny River neighborhood, which was evacuated on Sunday, is between the fire and the river.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch A stump burns on Monday, May 26, 2014, near the Upper Killey River, a tributary of the Kenai River. The Funny River fire burned through the area overnight.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch A spot fire burns on the north shore of the Kenai River near Torpedo Lake on Monday, May 26, 2014. The Funny River fire crossed the Kenai River at this point overnight and is advancing rapidly.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns near homes off of Funny River Road on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Firefighters prepare to create a fire break between the Funny River fire and the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling on Monday, May 26, 2014. The fire jumped the Kenai River overnight, threatening the neighborhood.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch A helicopter carries supplies for firefighters working on a fire break line near the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Alaska State Park ranger Jacques Kosto surveys the damage to WallyÕs cabin, which was destroyed overnight, on May 26, 2014, as the Funny River fire advanced past the Kenai River at the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling. The uninhabited cabin was donated to the state park three years ago, according to Kosto.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The forest near Upper Killey River, a tributary of the Kenai River, smolders on Monday, May 26, 2014, a day after the Funny River fire burned through the area, jumping the Kenai River.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The remains of WallyÕs cabin are visible Monday, May 26, 2014, after the structure was destroyed overnight as the Funny River fire advanced past the Kenai River at the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling. The uninhabited cabin was donated to the state park three years ago, according to Alaska State Park ranger Jacques Kosto.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch A stump burns on Monday, May 26, 2014, near the Upper Killey River, a tributary of the Kenai River. The Funny River fire burned through the area overnight.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Blake Geddys stands at his compound Monday, May 26, 2014, on the south shore of the Kenai River near Kenai Keys, which he and a group of friends managed to save from an onrushing wildfire on Sunday night.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Firefighters prepare to create a fire break between the Funny River fire and the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling on Monday, May 26, 2014. The fire jumped the Kenai River overnight, threatening the neighborhood.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Blake GeddysÕ compound, on the south shore of the Kenai River near the Kenai Keys neighborhood, stands Monday, May 26, 2014, after it survived an overnight onslaught from the rapidly advancing Funny River fire. Geddys and a group of friends managed to save every structure, while the surrounding forest completely burned.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Alaska State Park ranger Jacques Kosto surveys the damage to WallyÕs cabin, which was destroyed overnight, on May 26, 2014, as the Funny River fire advanced past the Kenai River at the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling. The uninhabited cabin was donated to the state park three years ago, according to Kosto.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Kenai Keys residents and a firefighter monitor a flare up across from the Sterling neighborhood on Monday, May 26, 2014. The Funny River fire jumped the Kenai River overnight, narrowly missing the neighborhood.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The remains of WallyÕs cabin are visible Monday, May 26, 2014, after the structure was destroyed overnight as the Funny River fire advanced past the Kenai River at the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling. The uninhabited cabin was donated to the state park three years ago, according to Alaska State Park ranger Jacques Kosto.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch With smoke from the Funny River wildfire darkening the sky, a horse grazes in a pasture along Feuding Lane in Sterling on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Blake Geddys stands at his compound Monday, May 26, 2014, on the south shore of the Kenai River near Kenai Keys, which he and a group of friends managed to save from an onrushing wildfire on Sunday night.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Smoke from the Funny River fire darkens the sky east of Soldotna on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Blake GeddysÕ compound, on the south shore of the Kenai River near the Kenai Keys neighborhood, stands Monday, May 26, 2014, after it survived an overnight onslaught from the rapidly advancing Funny River fire. Geddys and a group of friends managed to save every structure, while the surrounding forest completely burned.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns near the western edge of Tustumena Lake on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Kenai Keys residents and a firefighter monitor a flare up across from the Sterling neighborhood on Monday, May 26, 2014. The Funny River fire jumped the Kenai River overnight, narrowly missing the neighborhood.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns between Star Lake and Tustumena Lake on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch With smoke from the Funny River wildfire darkening the sky, a horse grazes in a pasture along Feuding Lane in Sterling on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Firefighters work along the completed fire line near Kasilof on Monday, May 26, 2014. The dark red streak is fire retardant.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Smoke from the Funny River fire darkens the sky east of Soldotna on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Ted Wellman, left, and his brother Tom Wellman maneuver TomÕs boat in a shallow part of the Kenai River two miles upstream from their homes in the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling on Monday, May 26, 2014. The Funny River fire crossed the Kenai River and is burning its way towards the Sterling highway.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns near Skilak Lake on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns near the western edge of Tustumena Lake on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch A spot fire burns on the north shore of the Kenai River near Torpedo Lake on Monday, May 26, 2014. The Funny River fire crossed the Kenai River at this point overnight and is advancing rapidly.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns south of the Kenai River in Soldotna on Monday, May 26, 2014. The Funny River neighborhood, which was evacuated on Sunday, is between the fire and the river.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns between Star Lake and Tustumena Lake on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch A helicopter carries supplies for firefighters working on a fire break line near the Kenai Keys neighborhood of Sterling on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch The Funny River fire burns near homes off of Funny River Road on Monday, May 26, 2014.
Loren Holmes
LOREN HOLMES / Alaska Dispatch Firefighters work along the completed fire line near Kasilof on Monday, May 26, 2014. The dark red streak is fire retardant.
Loren Holmes

Cooler, wet weather helped crews take the offensive against the Kenai Peninsula fire Wednesday, though rugged terrain to the east made access difficult, said the Alaska Interagency Command Center.

Officials were able to lift all remaining evacuation advisories related to the Funny River Horse Trail Fire by Wednesday afternoon, while estimates of the fire's span revealed that the blaze continued to grow. Its size was reported at 183,294 acres Wednesday -- about 1,000 acres larger than Tuesday's number -- with 30 percent containment.

"Fire activity has calmed down considerably," Tom Lavagnino, fire information officer, said Wednesday evening.

More than 710 people battled the fire Wednesday. With fire lines secured on the west and north flanks, crews focused on the northeast corner, where a spot fire burned earlier in the week at Kenai Keys. Six crews split attacks from the east and the west, laying fire lines, Lavagnino said.

Lavagnino said steady moisture, high humidity and quiet winds prompted a less aggressive burn Wednesday compared to what firefighters saw over the weekend. Nearly a half-inch of rain fell Tuesday night.

"It's not a wetting rain," Lavagnino said. "And it's certainly not enough to put a fire out."

The forecast calls for heavier rainfall later in the week. Officials said several straight days of heavy rain are needed to change overall fire activity, and people should expect to see smoke from inside the perimeter of the fire into summer.

The human-caused fire was sparked on May 19 in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. People flying in a helicopter overhead first reported the fire but did not spot anyone suspicious, said Doug Newbould, fire management officer for the refuge. Officials asked for the public's help Wednesday in determining who was in the area the afternoon that the flames began.

So far the fire has swallowed four recreational cabins with limited access and one outbuilding, including one historic structure, Lavagnino said. On the eastern flank, the most active part of the fire, crews were protecting various structures and land assets Wednesday, yet rugged terrain made access difficult.

The areas they aimed to protect included a Native allotment on Harvey Lake and a handful of private and historic cabins on the shore of Tustumena Lake, two private parcels on Skilak Lake, at Douglas Point and at the Alaska Wildland Adventures Camp, Newbould said. A public-use cabin on Emma Lake is also being protected.

Crews were also determining whether a fish weir on the Killey River, run by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, was defensible, Newbould said. Five people who were camping there to count king salmon were evacuated in a helicopter several days ago.

Officials said the Lower Skilak Lake campground, evacuated Sunday, remains closed until further notice.

Good news came Wednesday on the other significant fire in the state. Officials declared full containment for the Tyonek Fire that last week threatened homes and energy infrastructure in Tyonek and Beluga on the west side of Cook Inlet. The fire burned about 1,900 acres. A number of crews are leaving that fire; some will be reassigned to the Kenai.

Since April 1, 179 human-caused fires have burned a total of 185,898 acres across the sate, said a statement from the Alaska Department of Natural Resources.

Reach Zaz Hollander at zhollander@adn.com or 257-4317.


By ZAZ HOLLANDER, DEVIN KELLY and TEGAN HANLON
zhollander@adn.com