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Cash for super PAC backing Dunleavy for Alaska governor comes mostly from his brother in Texas

Former Wasilla Republican state Sen. Mike Dunleavy in a Senate Finance Committee meeting last year. (Marc Lester / Alaska Dispatch News)

The "Dunleavy for Alaska" super PAC that's boosting former Wasilla Republican Sen. Mike Dunleavy's gubernatorial campaign is bankrolled almost entirely by his brother in Texas, according to a campaign finance report.

The group has raised $110,600, according to the report filed Saturday with the Alaska Public Offices Commission; $100,000 came from Francis Dunleavy, a retired JPMorgan Chase & Co. executive whose home address is in Houston, according to the report.

Francis Dunleavy, reached by phone Monday, wouldn't answer questions from a reporter and hung up.

Mike Dunleavy is one of several candidates seeking the Republican Party's nomination in this year's gubernatorial race; he's the only one with a super PAC supporting his campaign.

The group bought its first round of advertising last week, spending $87,000 on radio and television ads, including some that ran during the Super Bowl.

Dunleavy for Alaska said in a prepared statement last week that its backers have "pledged" to give $560,000 — a substantial amount with the election still nine months away. But only a fraction of that amount has so far been transferred to the group, according to Saturday's report.

A political consultant working with Dunleavy for Alaska, Matt Larkin, said more than half of the $560,000 in promised cash comes from Alaskans, though he wouldn't provide an exact breakdown.

The group's three other donors besides Francis Dunleavy all come from inside the state: developer and sportfishing advocate Bob Penney; conservative activist Bob Griffin; and construction executive Josh Pepperd.

Of the $110,600 disclosed in Saturday's report, $10,000 came from Penney, $500 came from Griffin and $100 came from Larkin.

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