Politics

Q&A with Alaska U.S. House candidate Sarah Palin

The Anchorage Daily News asked candidates for U.S. House running in the special primary election to answer a series of questions. Read all of their responses here.

SARAH PALIN*, Republican from Wasilla

What in your background qualifies you to represent Alaskans in Congress?

Having lived here all my life, I have a strong connection with Alaska. My extensive history of serving and representing Alaskans will be put to good use in Congress. Three decades ago I was elected to serve two terms on Wasilla’s City Council, then two terms as the city’s manager after being elected mayor. In 2003, I was appointed chair and ethics supervisor of the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. In 2006, I was elected as the ninth governor of Alaska, the first female and youngest governor in state history.

Why are you running for U.S. Congress in Alaska?

Rep. Don Young left very big shoes to fill and you can’t send a rookie player to a varsity championship and expect results. I have experience advocating for Alaska on the national and international stage. America is at a tipping point. As we’ve watched the far left destroy the country, I knew I had to step up and fight for America’s solvency and sovereignty.

What would be your top priority if elected to Congress?

I plan to honor Young’s legacy by continuing his fight for the issues most important to Alaskans. America must become energy independent and Alaska can help do that. Alaska’s oil, gas and minerals are needed to feed and fuel a hungry nation. We are rich in God-given natural resources, and Alaskans are willing and able to responsibly develop them.

What is your position on abortion?

Abortion is taking the life of an innocent baby. Thus, I am unapologetically pro-life, and I’ll do what I can to help usher in a culture of life, love and compassion in our country.

If legislation came before the U.S. House that would guarantee the same abortion rights nationwide as the Roe v. Wade decision, how would you vote?

No.

If you oppose abortion rights, how should the federal government support a person who is forced to carry their baby to term against their wishes?

The federal government is the least capable entity to provide compassion or support for anyone, as is consistently proven. Better are families, crisis pregnancy centers, churches and other charitable organizations, and local communities.

Would you support a bill, if it came before the House, to expand the size of the U.S. Supreme Court? Why or why not?

No. Packing the Supreme Court would be a nakedly partisan power grab. The Democratic Party’s aim is to use the Supreme Court to achieve policy goals that they could never achieve through the normal democratic process in our republic.

*Note: Palin is one of several candidates who are also running in Alaska’s regular U.S. House primary election in August.

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